Sunday, March 30, 2014

Book Bug Bookstore Hosts Food Poetry and Essays

Photo
photo by Zinta Aistars

t reading on food at the Book Bug Bookstore on March 28, 2014I was one of several people who participated in the Friday night.  Here is my contribution.

Meditations Over the Onions

I will be out of town over the next two weeks so before I leave I need to hill the potatoes, and weed the onions and squash. I have only two days to do all this work, but I would do it! As a result, I learned something about gardening: it's not going to get done unless I do it, and I need to maintain my drive and will to get it done. Nature (i.e., the weeds) doesn’t take a vacation. But I was to learn another lesson about work today.
 Growing up in the great industrial city of Detroit, I have learned to work without stopping, which is not good for gardening in the hot sun. Pacing myself, resting, and drinking water frequently is an imperative! Wendell Berry addresses this frenzied notion about work by drawing the difference between industrial farming with a tractor and traditional farming with animals. Animals may be strong but they need a rest from time to time, so every once in a while, it's important to find a quiet, shady spot on the land where you can give the animals some respite. (It’s a nice break for humans, too!) Berry points out that this approach is so contrary to our machine culture where we keep going, never stop, and try to be more efficient. All this busy-ness also keeps us from thinking—and meditating. Actually, today I learned how to use the garden as a form of meditation.
 
Part of my need for a new approach to work is about discovering how I can simplify my life. I’m the type of person who likes to make a long list of things to do and then check them off as I do them. It makes me feel productive and vital. But what am I accomplishing if all I do is work? Where and when does the enjoyment of life come? Do I wait until vacation times or put it off until retirement and then collapse on a lawn chair from pure exhaustion? No, I must now learn to pace myself and find that quiet space within to feel satisfaction at whatever I’m doing. That’s the kind of balance that the nuns taught me about seeking the spiritual life. Such a slower pace allows “room” for prayer and meditation. So, since I desire an essential connection to Nature and a greater enjoyment of life, then I need to make “room” for it—and I can do it through the garden. Also, if I want to be a more thoughtful writer, I need to slow down my pace and resist cluttering it with endless activities. Today, as I worked in the garden I did manage to meditate. Here are some of my thoughts.
* When the field is covered with weeds, I have to look very closely for the plant that may grow into a vegetable. It becomes my focus. I try to save the plant no matter its size or scraggily appearance. Such care gives me a different relationship with the plant that emphasizes nurturing and then requires time and patience. It’s easier for me to have this relationship with the goats, who are animated, soulful creatures. So I worry about how I can have a relationship with the plants in the garden. What I discovered over these past couple weeks is that being with the plants has convinced me that I do care about them. After all, that is why I am here with them.
 
* My bones are weary and my muscles ache. My hands are full of new calluses, some of which burn from the hot soil as I pull out the weeds. I don’t know how the migrant workers do this all day, every day. Maybe my gardening is helping me empathize with them and their difficult lives a little more. This makes me more grateful for them and what they do! 

* To weed the onions I must get on my hands and knees. This is a prayer position, and it predisposes me physically to meditation. Then the bugs start attacking my bare arms and I think I will go mad. I remembered Sister Mary Bader’s experience in Texas where the gnats were buzzing around her face as she did the laundry. When she swatted them, they hung around her all the more. Then she just let them be and discovered that they left her alone. So I tried this today and it worked! Maybe the bugs are just curious. Maybe I entered their territory and they were checking me out.
 
* Being on my hands and knees as I weed the onions gives me an opportunity to be close to the earth where it's cooler and I can find some relief from the hot sun. Occasionally, a gentle breeze wafts through the garden, and it is so sweet. So I acknowledge it, savor it, and thank it. Such small pleasures really make a difference in my attitude as I do this hard work! Maybe I’m hearing the garden speak.
 
* To grow a garden, you have to have a certain trust that Mother Earth will make the plants grow. This seems to be a miracle to me. It's as though the plants are in a black box where the magic happens and out comes the fruit. Of course, there are scientific reasons for “the miracle,” but to me there are mysterious forces beyond the science that make it all work. Our industrial age has made us arrogant enough to tinker with these forces for the purpose of creating bigger harvests so we can make more money. The question is: have we fooled ourselves and altered the processes such that we might accomplish the opposite effect that we want—over the long term? I hope not. All the more reason for us to re-learn the process of growing food for ourselves—and to meditate on what we are doing.


Monday, January 27, 2014

Travels to Morocco




I went to Morocco in December and had a marvelous trip.  I traveled with Oversea Adventure Travel (OAT) with 13 other people.  We visited major cities (Fes, Marrakech, Rabat); stayed in a desert camp for 2 nights; talked with nomads in their huts; went to the medinas (e.g., old 9th century towns) and bought quality textiles, leather, ceramics; learned about Islam from an immam, climbed the Atlas Mountains (by bus, of course), examined the ruins of a Roman port city (Volubilis), and relaxed in a public bath called a hammam. 

Check it out on my travel blog:  http://www.olgatravels.blogspot.com/

This blog is especially good if you are planning or contemplating a trip to Morocco.   I highly recommend visiting this country and can give you more information about how to do it in an affordable way.


Monday, January 20, 2014

Internationally-Acclaimed Pianist Shai Wosner to Perform at the BBSO February Concert





Area concert-goers are in for a treat when Israeli-born Shai Wosner takes the stage as guest pianist at the Birmingham Bloomfield Symphony Orchestra concert on Saturday, February 8 at Christ Church Cranbrook at 8 p.m. and on Sunday February 9 at The Berman Center for the Performing Arts at 3 p.m.

The Steinway Artist will perform Mozart Concertos Nos. 14 and 19, and the BBSO will also perform Nielsen’s Little Suite for Strings on the program.  BBSO Music Director John Thomas Dodson will be the conductor.

“I want people to enjoy the music, to feel it, and be moved by it” said Wosner in a recent telephone interview. 

Concert patrons will have that opportunity in spades as they witness the power of his fingers on the keys and the heart in his music.  A sample of Wosner's artistry is available on his website (http://www.shaiwosner.com/media.html). 

“Music, including classical music, is not something you have to have studied to enjoy,” said Wosner.  “You just have to be open and let it move you, even if it is your first experience.”

Classical music is timeless and it has the ability to transport listeners to a meaningful experience, he said, if they just allow themselves to follow it.

Wosner has appeared with several important orchestras throughout the United States and Europe and he has collaborated in chamber music with musicians such as Pinchas Zukerman, Christian Tetzlaff, Lynn Harrell, Christiane Stotijn, and Cho-Liang Lin.  However, he also likes to play with orchestras in smaller communities because he sees them as one of the most important ways to promote and preserve this art form today. 

“Classical music is thriving in major cities,” he said, “but outside these main centers there is an incredible void.” 

“Music is disappearing!” said Wosner with alarm noting that music programs in schools are being reduced or eliminated and students aren't studying music or playing it as they once did.  In the nineteenth century even amateurs were performing classical music. 

“Music is an indispensable and a most wonderful part of our life and culture.”

Wosner, 37, grew up in Israel and began playing the piano out of curiosity because it was there in his home.  He essentially taught himself to play before he took formal lessons with Emanuel Krasovsky in Tel-Aviv as well as composition, theory and improvisation with AndrĂ© Hajdu. At age 21 he moved to New York and studied at The Juilliard School with Emanuel Ax.

Wosner performed publicly when he was 18 or 20, which is considered a relatively late age.  However, he continued to feel the urge to share his music with others.

“That was always important,” said Wosner, “and always rewarding.”

Wosner soon became an accomplished musician and his career skyrocketed to the international scene.  However, he doesn't dwell on his success because he feels a lot of it is out of his control.

“Luck plays a big part in music,” he said modestly.  “I concentrate on developing myself as a musician since no one else is going to do that for me.  It's all about finding your voice, and eventually, you are the best person to evaluate that.”

Wosner's performance of Mozart's Concertos Nos. 14 and 19 provides a particular challenge.  The pieces are not played that often or considered among the composer's most notable compositions.  However, Wosner is drawn to them because he can play them with several orchestras.  In fact, he will play the same pieces with the Hamburger Symphoniker in Germany later in February.

Color is the most important feature of Wosner's work where he tries to get as many “colors of sound” out of the piano as he can through the pedals, the volume of the notes, and the relationship between notes with regard to timing and turning a phrase. 

“There are different voices within a piece,” he said.  “The challenge is to get one instrument to do it.  For example, Mozart concerti are dramatic by nature.  You feel something is going on, like in a story.  There's a sense of drama, like a plot unfolding in the piece.  That's the biggest challenge:  to give what the music does and to go in the direction it is going.”

Wosner resides in New York City with his wife and two children.


Thursday, November 21, 2013

Music is Key to Good Living



John Thomas Dodson Named New Music Director of BBSO

Facebook, Twitter, Skype, YouTube, e-mail, cell phones and iPads have clearly taken over the way Americans communicate and relate to each other.  We now live in a virtual world where computerized, digitalized data is not only the norm, but the preferred medium because it offers speed, efficiency and infinite choices with the click of a button.  As a consequence, we are more and more separated from one another to the point that we don't even meet in the same room. 

So where does that leave the symphony orchestra?

“In the middle of the here and now with the possibility of making life more vibrant and meaningful,” said John Thomas Dodson, the recently appointed new music director of the Birmingham Bloomfield Symphony Orchestra. 

“You can't just pick up a bow and a violin and begin playing music on automatic pilot,” said Dodson.  “You have to be available to the moment in order to respond to it.”

Dodson explained this by comparing music making to the Japanese tea ceremony where participants are taught to concentrate on the slow movements of the ritual and forget about everything else going on in their lives.

And what do you get from such practice?

A revelation of that moment and what is really happening,” said Dodson.  “That's part of the magic of the orchestra as well as the case for it.”

Dodson went a step further by saying that the live musical experience is best enjoyed when it can be shared with others both in listening to and in talking about the concert afterwards. 

If you play a CD in your car and you don't like it, you can always turn it off and move on to something else,” said Dodson.  “But in the concert hall, you've got to live through the program and experience the unknown.  This is exactly what life is about.  And, in going through the concert—even if you don’t like absolutely everything in it—you discover something you did not know before and would not have known had you pushed the off-button.  Choosing what we want to experience often takes us away from the very thing that has the potential to transform us.” 

For example, an uncanny thing happened at a recent BBSO educational program at Seaholm High School when, for one work, the high school’s string students sat side by side with the orchestra's professional musicians. The Allegretto movement from Beethoven's Seventh Symphony was decidedly different than it was during the students’ experience in their own rehearsals at school. After practicing their string parts for weeks, the students joined the whole orchestra. Suddenly there were winds, brass and timpani around the room. Imagine how that sounded to them – a completely new layer of music on top of what they already had experienced in their own work. It’s as if they could take something they knew intimately and suddenly see all the new possibilities hiding within it. That’s what it means to be transformative.

Where do we put that kind experience on a standardized test?” asks Dodson.  “How is it measured?  And, what does such a test teach us about how to live?”

Dodson recently heard Leonard Slatkin rehearse a passage in Beethoven's Ninth with an unexpected Renaissance quality of sound that lent to its unusual beauty. 

It was the truth of the moment that came out,” said Dodson.  “I had never even imagined such a possibility in that place in the score. So, how can you stay home from a live performance and miss that kind of thing because it's more convenient to listen to the piece whenever you want to on a recording? It will never change in that recording. By definition, it already has everything in it that it can give. There is nothing else waiting to become new. That’s the opposite of the live experience because it is in NOT knowing what will happen next that provides the magic. You have to get up and go where the music is being made. In other words, it takes effort to be alive, alert and attentive—and that's the business of living – and of course, of making music too.”

However, living is not easy for most people.  Too often we feel an absence, like something is missing in our lives.  Then we try to fill it with distractions and diversions as though we were looking for a way out of the present moment so that we wouldn't have to feel things.

“We are so lost these days on how to live,” said Dodson.  “We have advertisers, media and celebrities telling us what to do and how to be.  But living life is the subject of the arts:  what is it like to lose, to hurt, to laugh, to mourn, to be confused, to lose face and find it?  These things are harder to measure in a world that counts what it knows.  We repeat what is familiar, and value what is efficient and cost-effective. Of course, it would have been more efficient, for example, to paint the Sistine Chapel with a roller, but then what would we have missed? Who travels to Rome to see a blank wall? We make the effort to go to that place because we want to see some form of wisdom made manifest through the artist’s incredible effort and willingness to share what he has found within himself. That’s what the arts are all about.”

It doesn’t take long to realize that Dodson is a deep thinker and a philosopher as much as he is a musician.  So how did he come to these notions?
“Look, I'm as confused as anyone else on how to live the good life,” he said.  “But I do think that there's no real reason to be here on this earth except to experience what arises and to share the truth of living. And that means being in the present moment. The great thing about music is that you get to be in the individual note and put it within its context of the phrase—as well as its role in the whole piece. The present moment opens up to something larger. It’s like having a microscope and a telescope at the same time. You can shift perspectives between small and large, but both views encompass the experience of now.”

A live performance also makes it especially incumbent on the musicians to be sensitive to the audience so that they are available to the new possibilities of the moment.  This is the reason why every live performance is something different, even though the orchestra always prepares and plays with technical acumen and an artistic drive toward excellence. 

For example, the music played on the night before 9/11 would have been vastly different from the same music played on the night after the tragedy because the mood of the audience would have been somber, frightened and in shock.

Real life involves risk and vulnerability,” said Dodson.  “You can't digitize it if you want achieve what is potential within what is happening. There is possibility for both imperfection and transcendence.”

In other words, life doesn't take place in an “airbrushed world” that isn't flawed or permanent, he said.  Musicians clearly recognize that they are vulnerable when they perform in the here and now.

“We are always living in an impermanent way,” said Dodson.  “We learn very quickly that we must always honor this particular manifestation of NOW—as well as the unknown.”

In fact, the greatness of the music and the performance is only able to emerge when the musicians accept the unknown even as they have prepared fully to present a valid interpretation of the music, he said.

Meanwhile, art also requires effort on the part of the audience.

“Of course, you can just relax and let it wash over you, but, if you’re willing to try, there is more to this than just passivity,” said Dodson.  “The music gets inside your heart, churns into something that stirs within, and then gives back – even long after the concert has passed.”

To illustrate, Dodson related a story about a man who admired William Faulkner’s books, but complained that he had to read them more than once to understand them.  Faulkner had no sympathy for him, though, because he knew that his books wouldn’t be the same if he had written them in easier prose.

Dodson brushed off any idea that he is a new kind of conductor and instead accepts that it's a new kind of time for all symphony orchestras who are trying to relate meaningfully to their communities. 

“Every person is searching for a way to point out what's important to include in their brief lifetime.  The question is:  Today is here; what will I do with it?” 

That's why Dodson changed his plans recently to hear the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra play Mahler’s Ninth in Ann Arbor’s Hill Auditorium under Michael Tilson Thomas.  He has long felt a special connection to the piece and wanted to experience it that night in person.

“I was interested in hearing it in that space, with those musicians, under that conductor’s leadership. Was it worth trading whatever I was going to do for that night of Mahler?” he asked.  “Yes!”

Coming to the BBSO is a particular treat for Dodson, but he knows it will not be easy.

I'm so glad I'm not just starting in this career or I wouldn't know the dangers,” he said.  “It is a marvelous community—one that has traveled the world and had access to a great number of experiences.  The people also have the ability to discern quality in music. They’ve heard incredible concerts in Detroit and in other major musical centers nearby and in their travels.  The challenge will be:  can we make a case for them to allot time for this particular orchestraand are we musicians able to provide them with experiences that are meaningful and artistically worthwhile.”

This task is especially difficult in an era where people have infinite choices available to them, so they have to know why they would choose the orchestra.

“We’re only an iTunes click away with a 99-cent recording vs. the cost of a symphony ticket,” said Dodson.  “But the most important thing is allotting time. Do they wish to interrupt their lives to give this a try? The key is that the orchestra has to find ways to use its own unique capacities to make magic in the living moment.”

Then the BBSO must compete with several other fine orchestras in the area all wanting support and attention, including the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

“Goodness knows that our goal isn’t to imitate them,” said Dodson. “They are great at what they do. What matters is that people also get the opportunity to see that we have something to offer that is a bit different from all the others.  Can we discover that together as a community and let it grow into a truly special experience? I think so. I hope so!”

Dodson said he has a lot of ideas about how to make it happen, but the question of what will work is again an encounter with the impermanence of art.

Ironically, when we need the orchestra the most is when we can afford it the least,” he said.  “What we must fight for and hold dear is the idea that the orchestra is critical to the heart of a community.”

This puts incredible pressure on professional orchestras whose business model includes overhead, soloist and orchestra fees, the unpredictability of ticket sales and the appearance of donors who commit to the orchestra’s mission.

Excellence has a cost,” said Dodson, “but mediocrity costs more. There has to be an expectation on the part of potential audience members that something incredible could happen in an upcoming concert. Otherwise, they just won’t go. They have to believe that they can’t miss it.”

However, despite all the good that music can give to a community, Dodson is very aware that the BBSO—and all orchestras—must face the question of whether there is an ongoing future for this institution. 

It all comes back to the NOW,” said Dodson, “and orchestras need to show that they can adapt to today's NOW even though their structures often encourage them to be slow to change.  The actions we take today have to be thoughtful in adapting to tomorrow, but adapt we must.”

The BBSO Education Program is one way the orchestra is trying to adapt, and Dodson is solidly behind that effort.

Bernstein once remarked that ‘to teach is to believe in the future,’ so not teach is to not believe in the future,” said Dodson.  “You don't do this kind work to get a grant or to get someone to write you a check—although you might get either one or even both—because you do it. You educate because your heart knows that you should—that you must. Education is a part of rebirth. It is the actual activity of believing in the future.”

The goal of an education program is not to create a zillion violinists, he said, but rather to teach people how to apprehend and recognize beauty and to be a part of it.

“So, the issue isn’t to have an orchestra because it's a nice thing to do. You have to see the larger purpose. The modern symphony orchestra isn’t just a delivery system for music in the same way that it was before iTunes came along. What's important is that the orchestra is a real vibrant part of a much larger organism, the community.  So, communities either die or they continually birth themselves.  Only the community can decide what they want to do about that.”

“We're serving as a big matchmaker here,” said Dodson.  “If the community falls in love with what we already love, then the orchestra will survive.  Some people will accept this love and some won't, but if people are never offered the opportunity to love the orchestra, then they are not free to choose it. 

Dodson doesn’t see education as something for people under 18 only. 

“Education is not a vertical relationship,” he said.  “Rather it is something that is a part of living and opening to others as peers or as one human being to another.  It's as if we approach a beautiful room and the orchestra says, 'here, let me find a way to open the door for you.'  You're free to go in or stay out, but if you don't know it's there, you won't go inside. The job of the orchestra in this world of infinite choices is to encourage the public to make music one of its choices.  In the bargain I believe that music is essential in teaching us how to become a fully alive human being.”

Dodson writes a blog called “Creative Destruction:  Fresh Ideas on Building Arts Communities” at www.artsjournal.com/creatived.  He is also the music director of the Adrian Symphony Orchestra and artistic director of Conciertos de la Villa de Santo Domingo.  


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

The Joy of Making the Music



Maestro Charles Greenwell Says Farewell to BBSO

You might say it all began when he presented oral program notes to the audience before he conducted a piece at a live BBSO performance. 

“It breaks down the barrier between the stage and the audience,” said Charles Greenwell, 25-year veteran conductor of the Birmingham Bloomfield Symphony Orchestra (BBSO).  “It brings them into the experience.”

His wife and best advisor, Cleopatra, suggested he continue with the practice when she recognized how favorably the audience responded to Greenwell’s impromptu commentaries.  It was as though he were satisfying their hunger for background on the various pieces the orchestra was playing. 

Such sensitivity and responsiveness to the audience has contributed to Greenwell’s tenure as the BBSO’s pops conductor for 14 years and then as its music director. 

“I love sharing things with people, especially the funny and serious stories of the music and the musicians,” said Greenwell.  “I like the audience to feel a part of what’s going on on stage.”

But the highly successful and much respected Greenwell has decided to pass on the baton.  He will conduct his last concert with the BBSO on Sunday October 20 at 7 p.m. at the Birmingham Seaholm High School Auditorium.

Greenwell’s passion for music began when he was a small child living in Manhattan with his parents who were both concert and opera singers.  His father sang with the New York City Opera and Beverly Sills.  When Greenwell was in his teens the family moved to East Lansing where his father was a voice professor at Michigan State University. 

“I love music and what it does to the human spirit,” he said.  “It creates an extraordinary range of emotions.  For me, this is truly wonderful and I can’t think of anything else that gives me this kind of satisfaction and deep-seated reward.”

Greenwell earned his undergraduate degree at MSU in 1961 and later his master’s degree in voice.  He also spent two years as Entertainment Officer of the 3rd U.S. Army in Atlanta.  After college he went to London and studied under Sir Adrian Boult at the Royal College of Music for two and a half years.  He subsequently toured Europe, Canada and the United States.

At the time of Greenwell’s emergence as a conductor there was really no training in the craft as there is today.

“To lead an orchestra, you either have it naturally or you don’t,” said Greenwell.  “I think I do, but it’s not something I think about.  Rather, conducting is about the way you deal with people.  If you don’t have that, you come off as mechanical or phony.”

Leading an orchestra requires inspiring the musicians, he said.  It is the “intangible in the art,” and if it’s not there, it can’t be created.

Greenwell’s success has also been about treating the musicians properly.

“I always made it a point to treat the musicians with great respect, love and dignity.  And, the musicians have responded to that.”

Primus inter pares (Latin for first among equals) is Greenwell’s watchword in conducting. 

“You are like a traffic cop with regard to tempos and dynamics, but it is not imposed.” 

Instead, Greenwell believes the conductor and the musicians should share in the interpretation of the piece with the goal of making the performance what it ought to be.

Actually, it is commonly assumed that professional orchestra musicians know the technical aspects of making music.  In community orchestras, however, the conductor must take into account the spirit of the music as well as its technical aspects.

“I tend to go more for the spirit,” said Greenwell.  “It doesn’t matter that it’s not perfect technically as long as there is joy in making the music, connecting with the audience and making the experience memorable and satisfying.” 

Greenwell also believes that the music isn’t just for the audience, but for the musicians as well.

“I hope the love I’m feeling for the music translates to the orchestra,” he said.  “I’m also concerned about the high-level of fun we have together.  I hope the overall product is that we provide a musical experience of great happiness where we strive for a common goal.”

One of Greenwell’s prime accomplishments with the BBSO was discovering and encouraging violinist Gabriel Bolkosky, the guest soloist for Greenwell’s farewell concert. 

Twenty-four years ago this month Bolkosky auditioned with the BBSO as a young artist and he has gone on to make a considerable career for himself, said Greenwell.  It was, therefore, a no-brainer to decide who should play as guest soloist at Greenwell’s final concert. 

The concert will feature Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 7”; Mendelssohn’s “Violin Concerto in E Minor” as well as his “The Beautiful Melusine.” 

“I always had it in mind to do the Beethoven 7th at my last concert with BBSO,” said Greenwell.  “And, once Gabriel Bolkosky selected the famous Mendelssohn E-minor Violin Concerto, it was a natural to add the lovely but infrequently-performed concert overture.” 

“The Mendelssohn is a very popular and flashy concerto that is always an audience pleaser and Beethoven's Seventh Symphony is not only amazing as it is Beethoven, it's one of Beethoven's best,” said Brandon Faber, BBSO executive director.  “It commands a great balance of strength and subtlety, fierceness and refinement. The Allegretto movement is one of his most famous musical passages and it stands alone as the second half of the program very, very well. I'm sure Charles has a particular fondness for this Symphony.”

Another of Greenwell’s contributions to the BBSO is to provide the audience with an “astonishing wide repertoire.”  It interests them, gets them to the concerts—and encourages them to come back for more—as they have all these years. 

Greenwell is also known for his work as a program host and music director for 20 years at WQRS-FM, a classical music station that folded in 1997.  He truly loved broadcasting, an endeavor he started during his college years at MSU some 40 years ago.    

Although he loved working at WQRS, he saw its end as a blessing in disguise:  he was able to pursue full-time conducting as music director of the BBSO and as conductor of the Southern Great Lakes Symphony (formerly the Allen Park Symphony Orchestra). 

Since the early 1990s until last year Greenwell has been assistant conductor of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra (DSO), which included writing the program notes and providing webcasts.  He has also directed the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Anchorage Symphony Orchestra, the Windsor Symphony Orchestra, and the Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, among others, and served as a producer for the recordings of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra for Chandos Records of England.

“There have been some wonderful twists and turns throughout my life,” he said. 

Perhaps those same twists and turns will emerge in his retirement, but Greenwell blithely says he will deal with life as it comes—just as he always has.

A great advocate of community symphony orchestras, Greenwell worries about sustaining them due to the financial difficulties they must face.  There were far more of them ten to fifteen years ago when grants and fundraising campaigns supported them, he said. 

The BBSO has survived well over these difficult years, but it still has to pinch pennies, said Greenwell.

Getting into music in general was a lot easier when he was younger, said Greenwell.  A musician could go to New York and earn enough between gigs and part-time jobs to keep going comfortably.  Now it is much more difficult.

“New York’s streets are littered with artists,” he said.  “So unless music is a passion that you can’t do without, your chances for success in it are not good.”

Nevertheless, and despite the grim prospects for a musical career, Greenwell encourages musicians—and all artists—to give it a try because it’s better to go to New York and fail than to not try at all—and spend a lifetime wondering if you could have made it.

As to the future of the arts, Greenwell remains “guardedly optimistic” or “rose-colored pessimistic.”  He predicts that the whole music scene will be vastly different from what it is now in just the next ten years. 

“Audiences have been graying for a long time and it’s rare to see young people at a concert,” he said.  “I hope we can keep things going because there’s always a place for orchestra, opera and ballet companies.”

It is critical that the young become more involved in the artistic experience, he said.  This is very difficult these days since music education has taken a back seat in the school curriculum and in some cases, it has been eliminated. 

He also emphasized that if music is not a part of a child’s life at an early age, it will not be there at all.  That’s where future audiences will come from. 

“Music has been my great love and passion since I was a child,” said Greenwell.  “I love music.  For me, it is truly wonderful.  What it gives us in rewards and satisfaction is almost like going to another plane.  There is nothing quite like it for the emotions it can bring out in us—as well as the memories associated with them.”

Greenwell expects the last concert to be bittersweet. 

“Twenty-five years is quite a stretch,” he said.  “But it’s time to get fresh blood and new ideas.  What the orchestra and I have shared is quite extraordinary.  We enjoyed working with one another and giving concerts.  There will undoubtedly be some emotion welling up on the last notes of the Beethoven.”